‘To anyone who has felt this way about someone else, it is probably one of the best things to say to another person. Sometimes it gives me chills even though it is so repetitive.’

Taken from comments on http://songmeanings.com/songs/view/3530822107859491034/

Yes, this song is repetitive. Check out the lyrics:

(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)
(Can’t do without)…

But the fact that despite this repetitiveness the song is so enjoyable only proves that it is something special. Because it really is. Right from the intro, it’s hook burrows it’s way into your brain like a worm. It’s one of those hooks which you pick up and don’t want to put down, like S Club 7 or Smells Like Teen Spirit.

But the brilliance of the song doesn’t end there. Although the song – unbelievably – is about as repetitive as it’s lyrics, the whole thing somehow just works. It repeats itself enough to allow you to really enjoy it but not so long as to bore you. The balance is so precisely perfect that it makes you really wonder how he did it.

The answer probably lies in the fact that Caribou did a doctorate in Mathematics, and reportedly applied it in making of this album. The way the song brings you up and takes you down could be visually represented in a sine or cos graph, beautiful symmetrical waves.

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